Maltese traditions : Qarabaghli mimli – stuffed marrows

This is one of the recipes most of us are familiar with. Marrows filled with meat or ricotta were part of our childhood; sometimes served in a broth. They are also served cold in some households. In either case, easy to make and truly delicious and heart-warming. We made the ones filled with meat, had some leftover filling which we used to stuff mushrooms with and when we had more leftover filling we cooked it and ate it alone. One of our best dishes yet..

You will need:

Fresh stiff marrows

400 g minced beef

fresh parsley

Mushrooms, chopped

1 onion, chopped

2 eggs

Cheddar, grated

Ground pepper to taste

You will need to choose rounded marrows – one stuffed marrow (i.e. two halves) will be enough for one person.

Scoop out the inside carefully (try not to pierce the outer ‘shell’) and set that aside. Do not throw the inside of the marrow out!

You will need to mash this – to make things easier cook it in the microwave for a few minutes, draining the water that comes out if necessary. Mash it up well with a potato masher or fork.

Now brown the onion in the pan and cook your minced meat. Add a bunch of fresh parsley.

While this cooks preheat your oven to 200 degrees.

Grate your cheese finely into a bowl.

Mix your cooked meat with the mushrooms and the insides of the marrow.

Beat the eggs in a bowl and add to the mixture. Stir well.

Place your marrow halves on a baking tray and using a tablespoon stuff them with the filling.

Place them in the oven for about 40 minutes. You may need to lower the temperature if the marrows start browning at the edges before the inside is cooked well.

These are the mushrooms we also stuffed in the mean time. These took about 15 or so minutes to cook.

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2 responses to “Maltese traditions : Qarabaghli mimli – stuffed marrows

  1. Thanks for reminding us of a good ol’ Maltese traditional recipe. Funnily enough, a version of this – stuffed marrow – was something my mum made a lot in the UK. I think it was a way of using my dad’s overgrown courgettes, and the left-over meat from Sunday lunch minced up! But what a sumptuous ‘left-overs’ meal it was. If you fancy a guest post on another Maltese speciality, do contact me at maltainsideout.com. We’re always keen to promote traditional fare – the meals that won’t cost much and don’t cost food miles! Keep up the blog – it’s tough I know, but rewarding…and all yours!

    • Thank you; it IS very rewarding and it also makes eating much more interesting and varied. The best part is when friends try out our recipes and let us know how it went. I find that almost everyone loves to talk about food!

      There’s a frugal side to Maltese cooking too and often one produces something great with left-over food that would have just been sitting there.. probably about to be thrown out – I hate waste.

      Kindly send us an email on honeyandmustard(at)gmail.com with more details

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